MidwestWeekends.com — Your Travel Guide to the Upper Midwest

Relishing winter in Duluth

In this sporty town, you can ski, then see ballet or a Broadway show — all within city limits.

Skiers on Bardons Peak in Duluth.

Beth Gauper

Skiers rest atop Bardon Peak in Magney-Snively Park.

When it's not cold or snowy enough in Duluth, the natives start to grumble.

This Minnesota port on Lake Superior loves winter, though it's not for weaklings.

The breezes that earned it the nickname "Air-Conditioned City'' will chill your bones in winter, and if you don't keep moving, you'll wind up as stiff as the bronze sculptures along the lake.

But in winter, nobody goes to Duluth to sit around.

Duluth is built on a hillside with lots of wooded ravines cut by creeks. The town has turned the ravines into parks that are perfect for skiing, boarding, tubing, skating, snowshoeing — you name it.

As soon as there's enough snow, the city forester grooms 67 kilometers of cross-country ski trails in five parks plus Spirit Mountain, and there are another 15 kilometers at Snowflake Nordic Center. 

Spirit Mountain has 22 downhill runs and Minnesota's second-longest vertical drop, plus six lanes of snow tubing, a zipline and an alpine coaster.

In the middle of town, there's more modest alpine skiing plus a speed-skating rink at the Chester Bowl, which once had five ski jumps, including 115-foot Big Chester, at one time largest in the world.

Snowshoers like the 43 miles of Superior Hiking Trail that cut across Duluth, roughly parallel with Skyline Parkway. And there's free ice skating at Bayfront Park and a dozen other rinks.

The best thing? Everything's right in town, never far from a cappuccino or craft beer.

Winter also is high season for nightlife, and you can go highbrow or lowbrow. At DECC auditorium on the harbor, see a concert by the Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra or Minnesota Ballet.

Start of the Beargrease.

Torsten Muller

The John Beargrease Sled Dog Marathon starts in Duluth.

Or watch the Harbor City Roller Dames in a roller-skate battle or the University of Minnesota-Duluth Bulldogs play hockey; the men were Division I champions in 2011 and the women most recently in 2010.

We've been to Duluth many times in winter. Once, a friend and I went up on a Thursday to get midweek rates at Spirit Mountain, which has long, undulating slopes and a spectacular view of St. Louis Bay and Canal Park.

My favorite run was the Timber Cruiser, a mile-long intermediate run that winds to and fro through trees. My friend tried out the black-diamond Gandy Dancer and Bear Claw, while I practiced turns on the long, extra-wide Four Pipe, a great run for beginners.

We also saw a show at Renegade Theater Company, shopped at DeWitt-Seitz Marketplace on Canal Park and had dinner and wine flights at Bellisio's, under sponge-painted peach and brick walls and a wrap-around mural of the Italian countryside that made winter seem far away.

One January, we rented a lakeside cottage on Park Point and got to town in time to ski the lighted trails at Lester Park.

The next day, we skied at wilder Magney-Snively Park, on the opposite end of town, stopping to admire panoramic views of St. Louis Bay from Ely Peak and Bardon Peak. Then we skied the gentler loops at Hartley Nature Center, in the center of town.

We shopped on Superior Street, drank craft beer at Fitger's Brewhouse, walked on the dunes outside our cottage and warmed up with mochas.

One November, we skied at Snowflake Nordic Center and stayed at Fitger's Inn in the old brewery complex, where we also went to a dinner theater and shopped.

And one March, we got to Duluth just ahead of a blizzard and woke up to 20 inches of new snow and 70 mph winds.

Amazingly, the city plowed the streets right away and we were able to ski in Lester Park that afternoon, following the tracks of other skiers. By Sunday afternoon, city groomers had reached the Piedmont trails, and we were able to ski on fresh corduroy.

As one of the handmade wooden signs along the trails puts it, "What could be better?''

Ore boat arriving in Duluth.

Beth Gauper

There's boat traffic until the Soo Locks close in early January.

Trip Tips: Winter in Duluth

2014 events: Jan. 26, John Beargrease Sled Dog Marathon.

Downhill skiing: Spirit Mountain has 22 runs and a vertical drop of 700 feet, the second-longest in Minnesota after Lutsen Mountains on the North Shore, which has a 1,088-foot drop.

If you're a beginner, reserve a spot at one of its free Learn to Ski or Snowboard Days in January.

There's also an Adventure Park with snow tubing, a zipline and an alpine slide.

In the middle of town, there's inexpensive neighborhood skiing at the Chester Bowl.

Cross-country skiing: There are groomed trails in Lester Park, Piedmont, Hartley Nature Center, Magney-Snively Park, Spirit Mountain and Chester Park. You'll need a Minnesota Ski Pass.

There are another 15 kilometers at the privately run Snowflake Nordic Center (and another 26 across the St. Louis River in Superior Municipal Forest).

For more, see Cross-country in Duluth.

Skiers at Hartley Nature Center.

Beth Gauper

Beginning skiers like the gentle trails from Hartley Nature Center.

Snowshoeing: The first 43 miles of the Superior Hiking Trail cross the city. It's great for snowshoeing shortly after a snowfall, but it quickly gets packed down.  Big Magney-Snively Park just west of Spirit Mountain is a good place to snowshoe

Ice skating: Skating is free at Bayfront Park on the Harbor and a dozen other rinks.

Accommodations: Many motels, hotels and inns offer discounted Spirit Mountain lift tickets to guests. And check the city's Hot Deals.

On Canal Park, the Inn on Lake Superior has a rooftop hot tub.

There are also quite a few cottages, many on Park Point.

For more about B&Bs in historic mansions, see Living like a millionaire.

For an overview of hotels, dining and other trip-planning basics, see Duluth 101.

Nightlife: Check to see what's playing at the Duluth Playhouse, Renegade Theater Company, Change of Pace dinner theater in the Fitger's complex and DECC Auditorium on the harbor.

For more, check Twin Ports Nightlife.

Details: See Duluth stories.



Last updated on March 4, 2014
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